NeuroCom International

STEP UP/OVER (SUO)


Description
SUO Report
Functional Implications

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Description

SUO Photo
SUO Photo

The SUO quantifies motor control characteristics as the individual steps up onto a curb with one foot, lifting the body through an erect standing position over the curb, swings the other foot over the curb, and then lowers the body to land the swing leg on the forceplate. Measured parameters are rising index (force to rise), movement time, and impact index (control of impact force descending onto the swing leg).

The SUO is a multi-segmented task critical to negotiating curbs, and climbing and descending stairs. The lift-up phase relies primarily on concentric leg strength to elevate the body onto the step. The descent phase in which the body is lowered back onto the floor requires not only eccentric leg strength, but also motor planning so that the swing leg lands on the floor with minimal impact.

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SUO Comprehensive Report

  1. The COG trace for each trial is shown on the left side of the report.
  2. Lift-Up Index quantifies the maximum lifting (concentric) force exerted by the leading leg and is expressed as a percentage of the individual’s weight.
  3. Movement Time quantifies the number of seconds required to complete the maneuver, beginning with the initial weight shift to the non-stepping (lagging) leg and ending with the impact of the lagging leg onto the surface.
  4. Impact Index quantifies the maximum vertical impact force as the lagging leg lands on the surface, expressed as a percentage of body weight.
  5. The shaded area on each graphic represents performance outside of the normative data range. Green bars indicate performance within the normal range; red bars indicate performance outside the normal range. A numerical value is given at the top of each bar.

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Functional Implications

Climbing stairs and negotiating curbs and other obstacles is a critical element of gait in daily life. For individuals with balance and mobility problems, descending stairs can be one of the most challenging demands in their daily activities. Like gait, stair climbing/descending is a complex activity that can be affected by a large number of impairments. Therefore, the SUO is generally a sensitive, but not specific, test of balance and mobility function.

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