NeuroCom International

WEIGHT BEARING SQUAT (WBS)


Description
WBS Report
Functional Implications

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Description

WBS PhotoDuring the WBS assessment, the patient is instructed to maintain equal weight on the two legs while standing erect and then squatting in three positions of knee flexion. The percentage of body weight borne by each leg is measured with the patient standing at 0º (erect), 30º, 60º, and 90º of knee flexion.

In the erect position, most body weight is borne through the skeletal system, and relatively less stress is placed on the knee and hip joints. Increasing depths of squat place greater stress on the knees and hips, making these positions more sensitive in detecting weight-bearing abnormalities related to lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries.

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WBS Comprehensive Report

  1. The percentage of body weight borne by each leg is depicted in the bar graph. Numeric values are given for each condition.
  2. The shaded area on each graphic represents performance outside of the normative data range. Green bars indicate performance within the normal range; red bars indicate performance outside the normal range.

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Functional Implications

Normal individuals maintain body weight within 7% of equal on the two legs over the full range of squatting positions. Individuals with lower extremity orthopedic injuries may exhibit equal weight bearing in the erect position, but will bear a preponderance of weight on the uninvolved side during more stressful squatting positions.

Reduced weight bearing on one leg may reflect sensory (proprioceptive) or strength loss, reduced range of motion, and/or pain. Bending, stooping and squatting positions substantially increase stress on the ankles and knees, and may identify weight-bearing differences not detectable in a less challenging (fully erect) position. Patients with generalized or unilateral weaknesses will demonstrate impaired motor control for sit-to-stand transitions or an inability to safely retrieve objects from the floor. In the athletic population, impairments may result in reduced readiness to move side-to-side or accuracy of weight shift or thrust during squat-to-extend movements.

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